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Employees from Florida Turbine Technologies, Inc. demonstrate Sonic Infrared inspection to Air Force Operational Energy staff, Jupiter, Fla., January 9, 2018. Innovating compressor blade inspection
Blade defects decrease engine efficiency and power, while increasing fuel burn (specific fuel consumption) and exhaust gas temperature (EGT) - resulting in higher maintenance costs, and decreased aircraft availability. Additionally, defective compressor blades can pose a safety threat if not replaced in a timely manner. While researching areas for increased aircraft optimization, Air Force Operational Energy found that cost-effective and reliable blade inspection ensures engines are performing optimally, and is paramount to maintaining aircraft readiness.
0 4/30
2018
Data showed Air Force Operational Energy that carrying extra fuel reduces efficiency by 2-5% on average mobility flights. Data enables the Air Force to ‘fuel more fight’
Data collection and analysis have been critical to maintaining the effectiveness and lethality of the Air Force for decades, and are more important than ever in the age of big data, machine learning, and the complex challenges of the 21st century. For Air Force Operational Energy, championing data initiatives is the cornerstone of their vision: to create an energy optimized Air Force that maximizes combat capability for the warfighter.
0 2/12
2018
Senior Airman Terrence Williamson, 736th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron aerospace maintenance journeyman, explains to Roberto Guerrero, Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Air Force for Operational Energy, Headquarters U.S. Air Force, Washington, D.C., how Microvanes positioned on each side at the rear of a C-17 Globemaster III fuselage using a Mylar template, Sept. 6, 2017, at Dover Air Force Base, Del. Microvanes essentially clean up the airflow in the region of the cargo door by re-energizing the air with small vortices that delay separation, smooth the flow, and reduce drag. “The programs APTO is working on are great examples of how we can increase our combat capability through the smart use of operational energy,” said Guerrero. (U.S. Air Force photo by Roland Balik) Dover helps AFRL make C-17s safer, lighter, more fuel efficient
The Air Force Research Laboratory’s Advanced Power Technology Office (APTO), Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, collaborated with Dover Air Force Base and private companies on programs to make the entire C-17 Globemaster III fleet lighter, safer and more fuel efficient for the future at Dover Air Force Base Jan. 30, 2018.
0 2/09
2018
Looking back at Air Force Operational Energy's accomplishments in 2017. 5 wins for Operational Energy in 2017
Learn about some of our favorite accomplishments in 2017 and the cool ways we’re innovating Air Force Energy.
0 1/02
2018
Two F-22 Raptor aircraft prepare to take off during an Air Force Operational Energy mission at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson in Anchorage, Alaska, August 13, 2017. The aircraft were part of a demonstration to assess if flying at an increased speed consumes less fuel and while saving precious flight hours. Could flying faster save the Air Force fuel?
In support of the Air Force Operational Energy Program, six F-22 Raptors flew from Alaska to Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii, accompanied by two aerial refueling KC-10 Extenders on Aug. 13, 2017, to determine if flying at an increased speed could optimize operational energy consumption.
0 11/20
2017
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