HomeNewsArticle Display

Final phase of C-17 drag reduction testing underway

Six microvanes are bonded to each side of the aft fuselage of the test C-17 for phases three, four and five in the C-17 Drag Reduction Program managed by the Air Force Research Laboratory, Advanced Power Technology Office, and tested by the 418th Flight Test Squadron at Edwards AFB. The C-17 Globemaster III used for all five test phases is provided by Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Washington. (U.S. Air Force photo by Kenji Thuloweit)

Six microvanes are bonded to each side of the aft fuselage of the test C-17 for phases three, four and five in the C-17 Drag Reduction Program managed by the Air Force Research Laboratory, Advanced Power Technology Office, and tested by the 418th Flight Test Squadron at Edwards Air Force Base. The C-17 Globemaster III used for all five test phases is provided by Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Washington. (U.S. Air Force photo/Kenji Thuloweit)

Three fairings are placed near the leading edge of the wing at the engine pylons of a C-17 for phase four of C-17 Drag Reduction testing. The fairings are placed in areas where indications of airflow disturbance were identified during computer simulations. Phase four tested the fairings along with six microvanes on each side of the aft fuselage of the aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Kenji Thuloweit)

Three fairings are placed near the leading edge of the wing at the engine pylons of a C-17 for phase four of C-17 Drag Reduction testing. The fairings are placed in areas where indications of airflow disturbance were identified during computer simulations. Phase four tested the fairings along with six microvanes on each side of the aft fuselage of the aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo/Kenji Thuloweit)

For phase five of C-17 Drag Reduction testing, two fairings will be placed on each winglet. One winglet fairing is located at the wing to winglet transition (shown) and the other fairing is located on the upper inboard side of the winglet. The winglet fairings will be added to the six wing pylon fairings and 12 aft fuselage microvanes of the aircraft used in phase four tests. All the test articles are 3-D printed by Lockheed Martin and bonded to the aircraft by Boeing contractors. (U.S. Air Force photo by Kenji Thuloweit)

For phase five of C-17 Drag Reduction testing, two fairings will be placed on each winglet. One winglet fairing is located at the wing to winglet transition (shown) and the other fairing is located on the upper inboard side of the winglet. The winglet fairings will be added to the six wing pylon fairings and 12 aft fuselage microvanes of the aircraft used in phase four tests. All the test articles are 3-D printed by Lockheed Martin and bonded to the aircraft by Boeing contractors. (U.S. Air Force photo/Kenji Thuloweit)

EDWARDS AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. --

When it comes to aviation fuel, the C-17 Globemaster III utilization rate makes it stand out as the largest consumer in the U.S. Air Force. This is why a team at the 418th Flight Test Squadron has been working for the past year on the Air Force Research Laboratory’s C-17 Drag Reduction Program.

The 418th FLTS is currently wrapping up testing with the final three phases – out of five total – using 3-D printed parts by Lockheed Martin. The Lockheed Martin installations use a combination of laser positioning for locating and sealant to bond the parts to the aircraft.  The laser positioning allowed the team to skip the design and build of installation tooling that would only be used during flight testing, according to test managers. The bonding simplifies the installation and more importantly leaves the aircraft in its pre-test condition after removal at the end of the flight test program.

The squadron is testing parts in various configurations to see if the external structure modifications can improve airflow around the airplane. During computational fluid dynamics simulations and wind tunnel tests, areas on the C-17 were identified that showed excessive drag and were targeted for optimization. 

In the spring, the first two phases of testing were completed. Those tests were conducted with two different configurations of parts made by Vortex Control Technologies.

The placement of the parts and the different configurations all have the same goal of reducing drag and improving fuel efficiency.

“A 1-percent improvement in drag reduction will result in 7.1 million gallons of fuel reduction per year,” said Bogdan Wozniak, 418th FLTS, project engineer. “One-to-2 percent drag reduction could translate to $24-48 million dollars in fuel savings per year.”

Currently, the team is preparing to test the fifth and final configuration using the Lockheed Martin parts. They have recently tested the third and fourth phases, which consisted of placing 12 microvanes toward the aft of the C-17 for phase three and then adding three fairings to each wing for phase four.

The fifth phase will keep the 12 microvanes and six-total fairings with the addition of two fairings on each winglet.

At least three flight tests are conducted with each phase – a flying qualities regression flight and cruise performance flights at .74 and .77 mach.  The team will also conduct airdrop tests in December to ensure the microvanes do not interfere with the C-17’s airdrop mission.

The flights are always the same to make certain the data collected in each phase can be accurately compared to each other. The 418th FLTS is also using the same C-17 for all the flights. The plane is on loan from Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Washington, along with four maintenance Airmen.

“Aircraft and atmospheric data are collected with the aircraft flying straight and level at a constant airspeed and constant altitude with low winds and low air turbulence at 90 degrees to the wind to mitigate head- and tailwind effects.  Each flight at a constant airspeed and altitude requires eight hours to acquire sufficient data for the analysis,” said Wozniak.  

Flight data is collected and put into a computer program developed by Boeing that puts out parameters for lift and drag, and then compares everything to see how much drag is reduced.

The flight tests here are the final stage of AFRL's program following computational fluid dynamics simulations and wind tunnel tests with a scale model. The data collected will be sent to AFRL at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, to see if any of the modifications increase streamlining and reduce drag. After that, Air Force leaders will ultimately decide whether or not any of the modifications should be implemented throughout the C-17 fleet.

The test team at Edwards consists of 412th Test Wing personnel, Lockheed Martin and Boeing contractors along with representatives from Canada, the United Kingdom and Australia, who have a stake in the program.

The final flight for the C-17 Drag Reduction Program is expected to happen in December.

Facebook Twitter
#WednesdayWisdom: Did you know that aircraft weight affects maintenance? By optimizing landing weights, we can increase readiness and make sure our planes are flying - and not headed to maintenance. https://go.usa.gov/xUaXt
#DYK Water management is also part of the #AFEnergy portfolio? Find out how the United States Air Force is developing a risk-based water management approach to improve resilience here: #p=56" target="_blank">http://online.fliphtml5.com/fedq/kepl/http://online.fliphtml5.com/fedq/kepl/#p=56
#AFEnergy gets the power to the warfighter! Check out this video tour of the 28MW array at 30th Space Wing (Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif.). #resilience
#MotivationMonday: Blue skies can even make Mondays better.
#DYK that Air Force Operational Energy funded upgrades to the tanker planning tool Jigsaw? We're helping create a more agile United States Air Force. #FuelMOREFight #FridayInnovation
#FridayInnovation: Our Operational Energy team is focused on how the United States Air Force can reduce fuel burn by decreasing aircraft weight. For example, the more fuel an aircraft carries, the more fuel it burns - so we are working with the Major Commands to optimize fuel loads and increase efficiency. Learn more: https://go.usa.gov/xUaXt
DYK fireworks generate 3 forms of energy? Read more about this and other firework facts from the U.S. Department of Energy.
That feeling when you know the United States Air Force has watch on the skies. 🇺🇸️🦅 #HappyIndependenceDay #FourthOfJuly
Our solar panels are feelin' this summer heatwave! #energyresilience
Catch up on the latest news with June's Energy Express. Out now! http://www.afcec.af.mil/News/Publications/EnergyExpress/
Got energy resilience? OEA can help! The office works to ensure Air Force installations’ get the energy they need. Check out OEA here: https://go.usa.gov/xQ8YB
A great example of Air Force innovation!
ICYMI: OEA Exec Director Robert Hughes talks new Air Force Energy Storefront, a one-stop shop for all Air Force energy resiliency initiatives at the AssociationofDefenseCommunities National Summit in Washington, DC last week http://www.safie.hq.af.mil/Programs/Energy/OEA/
When your corner office is better than theirs…#Airmen #MotivationMonday
Got an innovative idea on how to help the United States Air Force optimize its fuel consumption? Check out some of the projects we're working on and let us know how we can #FuelMoreFight. https://go.usa.gov/xQEHM
You are not forgotten. You are in our hearts. #POWMIADay https://t.co/yRQK6hxyAU
What do you think about the @usairforce using #AI in training? https://t.co/ePycm14Zud
RT @GenDaveGoldfein: #CMSAF at #ASC18: We cannot compete, deter & win without resilient #Airmen. https://t.co/RtKKSOakJm
Less than a couple of weeks until #EnergyActionMonth! #DYK that at Air Force Energy we also focus on optimizing its… https://t.co/amkloS58QM
#DYK that our Operational Energy team is working to integrate #agile software development into aerial refueling tec… https://t.co/LbwIKSkOUe
RT @AirForceMag: "From pain can come wisdom, from fear can come courage, and from suffering can come strength if —and only if — our airmen…
RT @AETCommand: If you’re here at the @AirForceAssoc #ASC18, make sure you stop by the @HQAirUniversity booth to see how they execute the f…
RT @DeptofDefense: Today marks 71 years of #AirForce strength in the skies. Happy Birthday to the @USAirForce. #AFBday #AF71 https://t.co/y…
RT @usairforce: .@SecAFOfficial: The #USAF we need to implement the National Defense Strategy has 386 Operational Squadrons. #ASC18 https:/…
RT @usairforce: .@SecAFOfficial kicks off #ASC18 w/ a State of the #AirForce update at 10:30 AM EDT. Watch live: https://t.co/JUU3q0Rnow ht…
Is there something we're missing? We want to know your innovative ideas to optimize the @usairforce's aviation fuel… https://t.co/zfcQNSn10X
“Keep at it — be tenacious, be bold, be innovative,” says Gen. Carlton Everhart, outgoing commander of… https://t.co/7wBE0H6bhT
Guess what!? #EnergyActionMonth is almost here! Throughout October we'll be sharing how the @usairforce is optimizi… https://t.co/Wzk5HHkvP8
Be prepared and stay safe during #HurricaneFlorence! https://t.co/7EwDEP0NSv